This body of work explores the idea of liminality in relation to both time and narrative. Influenced by the writings of Bergson and Deleuze, the work reflects on the conceptual separation of time as we experience it from time as we record it.

The viewer enters the installation in the midst of things, as the works loop at different lengths to create a condition of constant change, with no definitive beginning or ending. One screen shows a boat that has been left to gather rainwater, with the reflection of a day passing through it. Across from this, the shore of an island acts as a boundary that is circled but never crossed.

Different moments of time are brought together through a shifting soundscape, signifying change through sounds of bird song, ice along the shore and a boat rowing through the empty space. The movements of ‘Storm Ys’ are predicted and recorded through Shipping Forecasts over the course of thirteen November days.

Placed at set intervals, these forecasts punctuate the work. Combining imagery of transition and stillness, the work is characterised by a slow but continuous motion. The use of the forecasts contrasted with this stillness implies a distance, as though the storm is elsewhere, for now.

This body of work explores the idea of liminality in relation to both time and narrative. Influenced by the writings of Bergson and Deleuze, the work reflects on the conceptual separation of time as we experience it from time as we record it.

The viewer enters the installation in the midst of things, as the works loop at different lengths to create a condition of constant change, with no definitive beginning or ending. One screen shows a boat that has been left to gather rainwater, with the reflection of a day passing through it. Across from this, the shore of an island acts as a boundary that is circled but never crossed.

Different moments of time are brought together through a shifting soundscape, signifying change through sounds of bird song, ice along the shore and a boat rowing through the empty space. The movements of ‘Storm Ys’ are predicted and recorded through Shipping Forecasts over the course of thirteen November days.

Placed at set intervals, these forecasts punctuate the work. Combining imagery of transition and stillness, the work is characterised by a slow but continuous motion. The use of the forecasts contrasted with this stillness implies a distance, as though the storm is elsewhere, for now.









AND NOW THE SHIPPING FORECAST ISSUED BY THE MET OFFICE, ON BEHALF OF THE MARITIME AND COASTGUARD AGENCY, AT 0015 ON SUNDAY 20TH NOVEMBER

THERE ARE WARNINGS OF GALES IN ALL AREAS

THE GENERAL SYNOPSIS AT 1800

LOW 100 MILES WEST OF SHANNON 988 EXPECTED FAIR ISLE 970 BY 1800 SUNDAY. HURRICANE YS MOVING VERY RAPIDLY NORTHEAST EXPECTED FITZROY BY SAME TIME

Excerpt Video:

Project Specifications:

Vessel - Video Piece (9 hours, 36 minutes, 31 seconds)

Tempus - Audio Piece (5 hours, 37 minutes, 9 seconds)

Shore  - Video Piece (1 hour, 3 minutes, 38 seconds)